Tag Archives: Genesis 12

BIG Stories of the Bible: Abram and Sarai

The story of Abram and Sarai is found in the 12th chapter of Genesis. The first 11 chapters in Genesis is really a set of stories about God’s attempt to find someone who would live a virtuous life and bring blessing to all families on Earth. God starts by attempting relationship with the whole human community – but that did not go well. After 10 generations, God decides to destroy the masses and start over with one family – Noah’s family. But choosing a virtuous man does not guarantee that all descendants will be “Noah-like.” This plan doesn’t work either. Another 10 generations pass, and God does some thinking. God decides not to wipe out humankind again, but instead decides to choose an individual with no family in order to produce a family that ultimately will bring blessing to all the families of Earth. God chose Abram. And Abram is married to Sarai – who is barren.

Ironic that God chooses barrenness – but in this story and throughout much of the narratives in Genesis, barrenness is a metaphor for hoplessness. To be barren is to have no foreseeable future. There is no human power to invent a future if you are barren. But in biblical faith, barrenness is the arena of God’s life-giving action. God can provide what we cannot provide for ourselves. And Walter Brueggemann, Old Testament scholar, reminds us that a departure from securities is the only way out of barrenness. To stay in safety is to remain barren; to leave in risk is to have hope.

In the first 3 verses of chapter 12, we hear God call Abram – to “leave your land (country), your birthplace, and your father’s home. Go to the land I will show you and I will make you a big nation, will bless you, will make your name great, and will bless all families on earth through you.” Note that what comes first is that God will make a great nation. The context is not Abram – but a people. Blessing Abram is secondary.

I find it extraordinary that the text says “all families” will be blessed. That is pretty radical and inclusive. This image of God is very big picture, very all embracing. How does this compare with our own images of God?

Blessing is central in this narrative. Think about what it means to be blessed – or to offer blessing to another. Blessing is a gft from God issuing goodness and well being into life. Blessing manifests in fertility and multiplication in life. To have herds and flocks, crops, human life. Also material well being/peace/general success in life. And note the interplay between blessing and promise. What’s the difference between the two? Blessing is inadequate and incomplete without promise. Promise is the most basic category. Promise is more than what creation can provide. Promise brings blessing into the sphere of redemption.

In these first 3 verses, we learn that through the family of Abram – the new nation that will come – all humankind will be blessed. What does this mean? One idea is that this group of people will show how a community can live, will care for each other, will create inventions, cures, write literature, music, etc. that will benefit all humankind. And the social and moral point is that Abraham’s descendants are not to live by themselves or only for themselves. Whoever they are dealing with – these people will be a community that connects its birth with a prediction, a promise, an obligation, a destiny – to be a blessing to all.

Verses 4-9 tell of the travels of Abram and Sarai. As they go Abram builds altars along the way in special places. And they end up in the land of Canaan. We did not spend much time talking about this part of the story, except to note that later, in the book of Joshua, God delivers some of these places (like Ai) back to the Israelites – and this is in recognition of Abram invoking the name of God and building the altars. It gives meaning to the phrase that the good of our parents has implications for the lives of future generations. Or in the negative, the curse of the parents is left on the children.

While they are living in Canaan, things are not going well. That is always interesting to remember when we are being faithful and following where God is leading. We don’t assume a promised land is going to be a place filled with difficulties and trouble. But sometimes it is. There is a famine. The crops fail. And the only way to survive is to go to Egypt, where there is food. We noted that the famine was not caused by Abram sinning – but sometimes things just are hard. This new land has a lot of potential, but it needs a healing from what other humans have done to it.

Now the last part of the story has Abram and Sarai gong to Egypt. It is important to remember how old they were – Abram in his mid 70’s, Sarai in her mid 60’s. Abram is aware that Sarai is beautiful, and that the Egyptian men will want her for themselves. Some in our group found it hopeful that older women can be so desirable! One commentator I read said that this is the storyteller throwing some humor into the story. But at this point, Abram begins to scheme – and we wondered, does this mean he is no longer trusting in the promise of God? What Abram does is say to Sarai – if asked, we will  tell them you are my sister.  He is trying to survive. He assumes that they might kill him so that she would no longer be married.

There is some thought that Sarai might be Abram’s half sister. This would not be uncommon for that time. If she is, the Abram is saying – tell the truth, just not the whole truth. Don’t tell them you are also my wife. If she is not his half sister, Abram is asking her to lie so he won’t die. What do you think of this plan?

One commentator suggested that Abram had few options available to him. And none were perfect. He chose to enter a situation fraught with danger and ambiguity and devise a careful strategy, albeit imperfect, self-serving, and dishonoring of Sarai. Does this sound like real life to you?

The Egyptians do find Sarai to be quite lovely, and she was taken into Pharaoh’s house (do you remember who else was taken into Pharaoh’s house to live in a later story – Moses). The king was good to Abram because of Sarai. Showered him with sheep, cattle, slaves – made him wealthy. But then, God intervenes with plagues and Pharaoh asks Abram – what have you done to me – lying about Sarai? He throws Sarai and Abram out of the land – but lets them keep all the possessions they had accumulated in Egypt.

A couple things to note: First, Abram goes into Egypt assuming the worst about Pharaoh – thinking Pharaoh will kill him. But Pharaoh proves to be better than expected. Letting them leave with all their possessions is very generous. Second, it was Abram’s actions that brought about the curse. The one who is to be a blessing to all families on Earth also has the capacity to bring curse. In his first contact with outsiders, Abram fails to bring forth blessing. Instead, it is Pharaoh who brings blessing. Pharaoh proves the better role model. And we learn the God’s purposes are also served by “others.”  The “chosen ones” can do good and bring harm, and the “not chosen ones” are not automatically bad or against God. We have to watch what we assume.

Thirdly, have we noticed who has not spoken at all. Sarai! Why is she silent?  Is this her way of honoring Abram? Is she simply not empowered to speak because she is a woman? Do you notice that the story really  develops around Sarai – not Abram. She is silent but powerful. She is mentioned 13 times in this text. She is not a minor figure in the story. Sometimes we need to pay the most attention to the silent ones.

So that is the story. What does it mean to you? Why is it such a BIG story in the Bible? I hope many of you will share your thoughts by posting a response.

Rev. Joe Hoffamn

 

 

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